Balancing Act

This past week has been a test of my will and strength. I had never experienced using crutches before and have always thought, in my simple mind, it can’t be that hard/bad. Boy was I mistaken.

I should add that I went snowboarding last weekend prior to my PRP procedure and in a “skilled” move, looking to take a rest break, I sat back in the snow and bruised my tailbone. Ouch! Not only did that ruin the rest of my ski trip-because I couldn’t risk falling again, but as anyone who has done this knows, sitting hurts and it takes weeks for it to heal. Now add crutches and only balancing on one foot. Yay me! 😊 

So this is how my week has been. It’s bad enough to have you foot totally immobilized and unusable, but having to sit and roll on your tailbone to facilitate getting pants on over said boot, bending to tie shoe on the good foot, sitting on hard tile in bathroom trying to pull plastic boot cover on so you can shower…. ouch, ouch, ouch. You get it. No fun. The tailbone hurts way more than my foot, which doesn’t hurt at all. That’s the most important thing.

In fact, every part of my body hurts except my booted leg and foot. Hobbling around in crutches for the entire week has been quite the workout! The first couple of days I could barely get around without breaking a sweat! Nothing like a swift reminder of just how OUT OF SHAPE one is!! My right leg has had to balance and hop, perform single leg squats and pretty much bare all my body weight, which has accumulated since I haven’t run like I once did. It took about 3 days for my body and mind to adjust to this new way of getting around.

I have found it very interesting how our minds and body adapt to our circumstances. Survival instincts kick in. Or at least our capacity to invent. Ingenuity. How will I get from point A to point B with the things I need to carry when I have no extra set of arms? (use a handled bag) It really made me feel how fortunate I am that this is only temporary. How so many other people in the world are faced with certain disabilities and adversities and overcome them. We find a way to move on with our limitations. We don’t just give up. 

I’ve learned to manage my way, figuring out that I can do quite a lot of things left to my own devices. When my boyfriend is gone at work all day I have no choice but to get up and help myself. I am grateful and fortunate that our bathroom shower has a seated area (which I hadn’t given thought to before) so I can sit to wash my hair/shave my leg, etc. That the tub edge is wide enough to sit in so I could dry my hair. The kitchen is set up well too. The island is just close enough to the back counter that I could pass a plate or glass back and forth and slide it along to where I would need to, so I could feed myself (somewhat). In fact, our house is fairly handicap accessible. It’s one level and the only hiccups were entering the garage because it has a step down and getting into the shower-slippery and a step up and over. That scared me the most, but I figured it out and managed not to fall. I was mostly limited by the balancing on one leg. An out of shape leg that got tired fairly quickly. 

One night I was adventurous (or determined) and committed to cooking dinner. I had my boyfriend get the dry necessities down from the pantry shelves and place next to the stove that morning.

When it came time, I gathered the remaining items from the refrigerator and since I couldn’t carry all of them, I threw them to my workstation I was setting up so I didn’t have to go back and forth. This is what it looked like:


With all the pieces in place, I dragged one of the tall kitchen chairs over (thankful for slippery wood floors) gingerly sat down (remember my tailbone) and set to create my famous minestrone soup. Yes, beer IS part of the recipe. And yes, I ended up having to get a second one out because I drank the first while chopping up my ingredients. I’m human. And it tastes so good.

The soup turned out great and I know my boyfriend was thrilled he didn’t have to come home from work and try to figure out dinner, which is NOT his forte! That’s my department.

I have watched A LOT of TV this past week. I’ve been reading a bit too. It’s been restful, trying at times, as well as filled with tons of time for contemplation. I am grateful for all I have in this life and the ability to adjust to micro changes, temporary inability and self discovery. When faced with challenges it’s good to know that I can figure out how to make things work with limits. It has been a good lesson in not surrendering to defeat. It’s been nice to have help for sure but it’s also been nice to realize I can do things on my own as well. 

I’m hoping today is my last day on the crutches. I’ll be speaking with my doctor later and seeing how the foot feels. I’ve babied it all week and with that the hope is I will be able to bare weight on it and start my new job (I’m very excited) tomorrow with only the walking boot. I’m additionally thankful that my new boss already knows and is cool with it. 👍🏻

Abracadabra ⭐️⭐️⭐️ plantar fasciitis be gone!

Oh it’s been so long since I’ve written here, but I’m hoping that is going to change starting now. 

I peeked at my Facebook today (my New Years resolution is to stay off FB and check in once a month, which so far I have accomplished). But I peeked today, looking only at my “memories” which, I might add,  I haven’t liked being reminded over the past year of how many miles I used to run. Those posts have become a sad, distant memory for me. Today’s memory was just poetic- I was reminded that I had a cortisone injection 3 years ago today in my left foot for plantar fasciitis. I think that was the second of a total of three injections over the past 5 plus years for said injury. 

As I write this, I’m laying supine on my bed, my wrapped and booted left foot propped up on a super thick pillow, cat tucked in for a nap. A giant sigh escapes my body. 


Two days ago I had a procedure -a PRP injection – done on my foot. After 5 plus years of on and off chronic plantar fasciitis I decided to try something that will hopefully (and let’s all say a positive prayer for me right now) and finally end this injury. 

I researched, about a year and a half ago when I had my last flare up, shock wave therapy and found a doctor who is local (SF Bay Area) who does that procedure and does house calls, but at the time didn’t pursue him because insurance doesn’t cover the procedure and I didn’t want to spend the money when I was already paying for health insurance. I went to my regular podiatrist and that is when I received my third cortisone shot and was back in my walking boot. That worked as far as no heel pain and I only ran very short distances, 3-5 miles, closer to the 3 mile range and with walk breaks. I was terrified my PF would return if I did anything more. 

Last year I managed to run three 5K’s (2 of which I placed 1st and 2nd) and one 10K trail run (Angwin to Anguish), in the rain, where I was squeaked out of 3rd and got 4th. The 3rd place lady bamboozled me- but I won’t go there. It’s a great race btw, very scenic and hilly. 

 

The last 5K was a Turkey Chase here in Napa Valley. The whole family participated.


That was the last time I ran, and since then I’ve been mostly walking on my treadmill. After work, I’d jump on my treadmill and binge watch Netflix getting in about 20 miles of walking in a week. 

I could feel a tinge of pain in my heel coming on, but ignored it until about a month ago. The pain was coming back and I couldn’t really continue walking like I was. 

Enter depression. On top of having to put down my sweet golden retriever of 15-1/2 years in mid January, something that still makes me sad,  the pain was back and I was feeling hopeless. I would sit and think, why? Why when I finally found something that made me super happy, that made me feel like a superhero, that inspired me to push myself and encourage others, that made me feel like my life had purpose, why was this taken from me? Yes, I was feeling very sorry for myself. 

I was interested in the shock wave therapy again and decided to see if I could get that done. I called my podiatrist and asked if I could do it. Typical doctors office response “we haven’t seen you in 15 months, so you need to come in first and have the doctor exam you.” Yes, so he can tell me the same thing and charge me more. This doctor too, advised me to stop running. This is just not an option. 

Enter Doc On The Run. I emailed him all that I have been through with the laundry list of therapies I’ve done to rid myself of PF. Nothing has permanently gotten it to go away. 

Doc On The Run isn’t your ordinary podiatrist. He’s an award winning foot surgeon who is himself an athlete, runner, cyclist, ironman. Who better to consult with than someone who can relate and is an expert in the field? I’d been on his email podcast list since I researched him a year and a half ago and because I am in between jobs this week, wanted to take advantage of this time off to fix my foot once and for all! Unlike my old podiatrist who couldn’t move quickly, Dr. Segler was on it. He called me right away and we talked about my options.  We set up a formal consultation for the next day (this was last Thursday before my week off) and he told me all the options I could choose from and recommended the PRP injection as my best treatment. Taking advantage of having this week to recover he arranged for the procedure to happen on Monday giving me the entire week to rest my foot before starting my new job. 

I can’t tell you how impressed I am with Dr. Segler and his services. He is available 24/7 to answer questions. He responds within hours of any emails. He calls on the Weeknd. HE MAKES HOUSE CALLS! 

Doc On The Run check him out for yourself! He works worldwide.


The big day: Dr. Segler worked some magic to expedite getting the equipment and drove up to my home in Napa to perform the PRP injection. He was very professional and took the time to go over everything and answer all the questions I had. He set up a sterile area in my living room where I would be getting my injection. 

First he drew blood from my arm. I told him I bruise easy with blood draws and he said then I would probably have a bruise. But my bruise is very small and almost unoticeable which is great since I expected it to be huge. It’s not. Then he placed my blood in a centrifuge, where it spins my blood for 15 minutes. This separates my blood into 3 sections. The middle section holds the platelet rich plasma which is what will be injected back into my foot to promote healing. 


You can see my foot is all prepped. While my blood was spinning he injected my foot with lidocane, a numbing agent. This was the most painful part. I think I kicked him during one of the injections. Sorry doc. 

Now that my foot was numb and the PRP ready he quickly injected my foot on the spots he had marked on my foot prior. I didn’t feel a thing and afterwards he showed me the rather large needle. Yikes! I kept my eyes closed for all the injections as I was already nervous about it all. I kinda wished I had watched the plasma injections. When I had dared to open my eyes he was already done.

He then wrapped my foot and leg in a wet cast and a couple other layers of gauze or dry cast material. Not sure of the technicalities of it all. He finished it off with a sock.


And lastly, the full length walking boot.

I was given a folder of written instructions and a pain script, he made sure I was comfortable and had my TV remote. ☺️Number 1 instruction: stay off my foot for 48 hours, best… stay in bed. And so here I am. I have crutches if I need to get up, and am to use for the rest of the week. Followed by a week or two in the walking boot. I’m not thrilled to be in the boot for my new job, but at least I won’t be on the crutches and frankly, the more I can stay off my foot the better it will heal and I’m 100% behind that! 

Can I say, walking on crutches sucks! My armpits hurt!! 

Dr. Segler was here for about an hour and a  half. My foot was pretty numb afterwards and that lasted for a few hours. He called me before I went to bed to check on me. How many doctors do that? Um… none! The only pain I felt was during the night. The top of my foot was super achy. I called him at 5:30 am after being up every two hours. He told me to remove the top layer of coverings on my foot. That helped. Last night I still had some pain on the top of my foot. I don’t know why things have to hurt during the night. I think it hurts because my foot is in a flexed position and when I’m sleeping it doesn’t get much circulation. One thing I haven’t felt, heel pain. The only pain I feel is from hobbling around in crutches. All those muscles hurt and make me not want to get up. I guess that will keep me off my feet! Did I mention my armpits HURT! 

So the doc will check in again this week and I will take off the bandages maybe Friday while he is on the phone with me remotely. At that point I will just be in the walking boot for a week, maybe two, hopefully not three. It will just depend on how my body is healing. This has been chronic for so many years, it could take time. I’m hoping not so much time. 

For more information about PRP click this link.  PRP
Keep your fingers crossed for me, say a prayer, send me good positive vibes. I need to get better. I need to run again. I need to be my best self. I need to be me! Whole and healthy. 

Thank you!! I will keep you posted.

WPW Syndrome

I’m laying on a table with multiple wires hooked up to me while a new doctor is taking an EKG reading. He says rather excitedly, “this is the kind of rhythm I tell my students to look for and they can never find. If they were here right now, I’d have them come over and look.”

These were not comforting words to hear just prior to taking a treadmill stress test. He said I had an abnormal rhythm which I already knew from two previous doctor visits. I went ahead and did the test, he and my cardiologist of one month both said I was very fit. They didn’t say much else. I went home with an appointment to see my cardiologists colleague, Dr. D, a specialist in ablation, the following week as well as an appointment to get an echocardiogram, an ultrasound of my heart.

The last time I posted on here was back in March. I had just received a cortisone shot for my plantar fasciitis and was starting back up running. I was excited to be able to run again. Until I started running. Man, it was hard. Harder than I can remember. It took me forever it seemed to build back up to running 4 miles. And honestly, I think in the last 3 months, I ran 4 solid miles maybe once without having to take a walking break. I thought this was really odd, but chalked it up to the fact that I hadn’t had any real physical activity for 4 months. When I was running, I’d think to myself… ‘I cant believe I ran my fastest half marathon just six months ago. I can’t even imagine running that far anymore.’

I haven’t felt like posting because, there was nothing exciting about my running. In fact, it wasn’t so fun and I thought maybe I didn’t want to run anymore. Although my mind still wanted to, my body didn’t.

On top of not feeling right running, I was also experiencing chest pain daily. I also thought, great, now I have heartburn again. I had this happen to me 5 years ago and at that time, I had an endoscopy performed and although they didn’t find anything, they told me I had acid reflux. So, I was really careful with my diet after that. When I went to the doctor a few months ago for the “heartburn”, I was also given a resting EKG and that is when they first noted an irregular rhythm. At first, they said it was nothing, but a week later I was told to go to a cardiologist. Okay, kinda scary.

The cardiologist performed the same test, with the same finding. It only takes about a minute. So what I have, is ALWAYS going on. He told me there was a pause in my PR interval. I didn’t really know what that meant. He said to do a stress test where they test you hooked up to the EKG while walking to running on a treadmill for about 20 minutes that gradually got harder. A few days after my visit with him he called me and also recommended I do an echocardiogram. I was starting to get a little nervous. But he told me I could still run, just nothing crazy and to keep taking my walking breaks. Listen to my body. So I didn’t think too much about it.

When I had my visit with his colleague, Dr. D… She was rather serious in what she was explaining to me. Very matter of fact. She pulled out an illustration of a heart and starting drawing on it. I didn’t fully understand what she was really trying to tell me, but basically she said I had an extra electrical pathway in my heart that if left untreated, I risk passing out or worse, dying (Holy F!) and recommended I do this procedure; an electrophysiology study and ablation. This is where they go in with cameras through your groin and see where the extra pathway(s) are. Doing the procedure doesn’t really bother me. I mean, I am a bit scared thinking that they will be inside my heart, the organ that keeps me alive. No, what really scared me was her telling me not to do anything physical. No running. Stationary bike may be ok, and I could walk WITH A FRIEND. I took that as no walking alone. Don’t do any boot camps. Um… yeah, now I’m scared!

Again, still in shock I asked if there was medication I could take instead and she said no. I said, do I really need to do this? She told me, “look, as your doctor I’m telling you that if you don’t, you risk passing out, or… people die from this.” Ok, still in shock here. I said ok. I got it. Do this or you could have a heart attack. I went to work and was pretty much in a haze the remainder of the day. I made a lot of mistakes that day. Two days later I did the echocardiogram. A woman sitting next to me in the waiting room said, you look to young to be here. Ah… yes, I feel like that when I look in the mirror. But I just turned 49 the beginning of May. ((sigh))

I also found out that day the official diagnosis. I had forgotten to ask. I have Wolff Parkinson White Syndrome. This is a congenital heart condition. It means that you were born with an extra electrical pathway in your heart. That means that when the main pathway we all should be using to regulate beats between the upper and lower chambers of the heart says not to send the blood to the lower chamber, my heart says screw you… I’m using my own super highway to get there. That is when problems arise, like the above mentioned passing out or worse. That’s my description of it anyhow.

Dr. D asked me a bit about my family history. I told her I have and uncle and his mom (my grandma) who both died of heart attacks. They are on my moms side of the family. I later found out that my grandma’s sister has a pacemaker. So heart issues are in the family. Dr. D also asked me if I had ever passed out before or felt like I was going to. I did once when I was in my early twenties. I always thought it was because I was on medication that lowered my blood pressure. Still think that’s why. But i also remembered this and it’s actually funny in a way. I said… geez, when I was married, I used to say all the time, “I don’t feel well. I feel like passing out” to the point where my now ex said, “well then pass out already!” I know, not very compassionate. I asked him the other day if he remembered me saying that, that I felt like passing out and his response was… “OMG… ALL THE TIME!” At least I wasn’t imagining it. I also told the doctor that there have been a few times when I’ve done a longer run, like 10 miles, and when I’m taking a shower after I would feel really bad like I was gonna pass out. I always thought it was just because running is so hard. But now it makes sense to me.

Having something wrong with your heart after you’ve run two marathons in one year, a spartan race and a handful of half’s seems so ludicrous. I mean… me? Seriously? In some ways I still don’t believe it. How can it be? But then I start getting tightness in my chest and I think… okay, maybe. It is still all so surreal. The only time it really resonates is when I think of my running and how hard I was training and how I always still felt out-of-shape. That never seemed right. That and the fact that I was ALWAYS tired. Isn’t running supposed to make you have more energy? There were some days where I had zero energy and just could literally do nothing. So in that sense, this syndrome does make some sense.

For the past week I have worried everyday to not get too stressed and not overdo anything. I’m scared to death that something could happen even though nothing has happen in all my 49 years. It’s crazy to think it could have.

I don’t want to waste any time in getting this thing fixed, so I’ve scheduled the procedure for this Wednesday. The procedure takes about 2 hours of studying the heart. They go in through your groin with cameras and such. Then find the extra pathway and destroy it. Then I am supposed to lay still for 4 hours and lay low a few days. I will be overnight in the hospital. The procedure is pretty routine. And the prognosis is good. This can permanently fix it. I did ask Dr. D what happens if it doesn’t fix it. She threw out that I may have to get a pacemaker. That is the worst case scenario. I don’t think that happens too much. I think the ablation will likely be successful and I will be a brand new woman and ferocious runner. Its funny how when you are told you can’t do something you want to do it all the more.

Right now I’m sporting a groovy paper bracelet for the next day. It’s got all my info on it courtesy of the hospital and the pre-op blood work I did this morning. They did two blood draws, one from the inner elbow and one from the back of my hand, which ouch, was painful. 13 vials of blood. One more day before my procedure. The waiting is the hardest part.

this is an awesome look for work tomorrow.

20140526-220142.jpg

Girl Gone Loco

I got my custom orthotics the other day (Wednesday). I had meant to post just how excited I was to be getting them. Yes, you heard that right… EXCITED! Me. The girl totally against wearing orthotics. But, not running for 4 solid months can drive a person crazy and I think that is what has happened. I’ve gone loco.

The orthotics are half hard plastic, something you would think is totally uncomfortable to wear, and half soft.

hard plastic and extra cushion beneath small toes

hard plastic and extra cushion beneath small toes

But they are actually almost unnoticeable. With the exception of my left foot with the PF, there is a slight indication of their presence in my arch. This is because that poor little arch has been so unhappy and in pain for so long, that it is going to take up to six weeks to get used to feeling better. I don’t think it will take that long.

The right foot feels great. Mine are already a little broken in as you see. So far, the PF has not been bothering me. Also, notice that there is a thicker section of padding under the outer toes on my left troubled foot. This is to help me not get blisters from putting added pressure on the ball of my foot which always gets swollen when I run. I hope it works! There is also a hard plastic heel that is slightly raised with ridges on the bottom. I guess that is too keep them from sliding around when I run? I didn’t ask.

typical foam tops ~ can you see the heel?

typical foam tops ~ can you see the heel?

I will confess, I started running a little about 5 days before I got the orthotics. Just quarter mile jogs with walk breaks. I wore my old green Superfeet with a hole cut out for the ball of my foot. Those actually felt WORSE than the new orthotics. I am so happy to be starting back. Just that little bit of running makes me feel so much better!

Now for the real loco part…

The other exciting thing that happened to me on Wednesday was I got to pick up something I ordered a week and a half prior when I was down in La Jolla for a mini break with Tom. It wasn’t too crazy a purchase, as I have been looking at these things for over a year now. It was crazy in that I have opened myself up to other possibilities than just being a runner. Yes running… you have to move over now for some other activities.

Meet my new friend.

shiney bright red fuji ~ it was love at first sight!

shiny bright red fuji ~ it was love at first sight!

Isn’t she just B-E-A-UTIFUL! I knew the moment I saw her that she was going to be mine. I seriously haven’t been all that excited about a bike the whole last year looking at them. Funny, that old saying, what a difference a year makes! (I need to remind myself of that often I think.)

Tom was as excited as me, if not even more so, as now we will be able to ride together on occasion. I am really looking forward to spending that time together.

I have so much to learn about bikes. I am really a total newbie. In the bike shop the specialist there, William, fitted me to the bike. He was talking derailleurs, and cranks and hoods and well… he might as well have been speaking to me in Chinese. I just sat there pedaling along nodding my head for the most part acting as if I understood everything.

getting fitted, it was fun

getting fitted, it was fun, and yes, those reflectors had to go

I did understand the idea behind fitting me to the bike and that worked out well. Tom got me these awesome clips, that match the pretty red on my bike and my white shoes and a helmet I dubbed the batman helmet. He is the best!

We He set the bike up on my trainer (that I had previously rode a very old, flat tired mountain bike on-don’t ask) so I can practice clipping and unclipping. I rode it for about 30 mins the other night.

indoor use

indoor use

It is a really nice bike. It’s the Fuji Gran Fondo 2.3 carbon frame something or other. Yes, I have a lot to learn. I think Tom needs to make me a chart with all the fancy names a bike now has. What ever happened to seat, brakes, pedals and gears? Now it’s so complicated (and ESPEN$IVE!) I bet the folks back in the early 1800’s on the first bicycles made would fall off their bikes at the prices and think we were speaking Chinese too!

I just love the red color. I think I have a thing for Fuji’s. I am really into these red ones too.

the only apple i'll eat!

the only apple i’ll eat!

I’ve already bought a few cycling skorts to ride in. Super cute stuff I found at Team Estrogen. I’m not a huge fan of regular cycling shorts, but that is because I beat to a different drum. That’s not to say I will never wear them, I would rather wear the skort. Much more feminine. I like my running fashion, and I plan to be the same crazy fashionista on the bike. That’s half the fun!

Last night Tom took me over to the local high school football field to practice riding and clipping in and out. He said the soft surface is a good place to practice in case I fall over. I may have been a little smug in thinking that there is no way I am going to fall over. That theory lasted for the first few clip in and outs, which at least my feet clip out fairly easily. And then boom! I actually fell over one time. Just went PLOP! I couldn’t believe it. Just me and the bike laying together on the ground, still attached. Damn, I hate it when Tom is right. Hit my knee pretty good on the fake turf, and my entire left side was covered with the prickly green shreds, but overall, it was pretty frickin funny! I hope that doesn’t happen on the road. I did a few laps on the track, which felt great and practiced slow and fast stops. No more falls at least. Riding a bike is trickier than you’d think. As I’ve said… I have much to learn.

I decided that the best way for me to avoid the PF is to run 3 days a week and ride 3 days. I’ve already worked out how I will divide that time. Right now I’m waiting for the raining skies to clear so Tom and I can do my first real ride. I’m not sure that will happen today as the weather is not cooporating, but I am excited! I might even be up for a short spin in the drizzle… yes, I have gone loco and loco feels good!

Gobble Gobble, Turkey Wobble

A few weeks back I thought I would be running a turkey trot today. But those plans have changed. I haven’t run in 4 weeks. I haven’t run since the half marathon. This is where my foot has been living the last few days, in the dreaded walking boot.

good times

good times

For the most part, I’m ok with this. I want my PF to get better. It is starting to get there. Unfortunately, not running is starting to take it’s toll. On my mind. In my butt. You get it.

So, there will be no turkey trot, no calorie burn to offset the holiday consumption. Instead I will just enjoy the holiday festivities to the best of my abilities and relax, knowing that in time, I will be able to run, and not hobble around as I am right now. That is when I will get back in shape and feel more “normal.” I hope it’s before Christmas. Please be before Christmas. Please.

Till then, I wish everyone a Happy Thanksgiving filled with yummy food, close family and much love. And yes, I am still going to eat these little birds I made.

sugar!! cookies

sugar!! cookies

Hoka Ray!

My son passed by my bedroom today as I was lying there on the bed, feet hanging over the edge, in my new run shoes.  “Oh, you got new shoes,” he says. It was becoming a mini new shoe party in my room.

why do cats love to sit in boxes?

why do cats love to sit in boxes?

Then he said, “well, don’t go out and run 20 miles in them. You know you over do it.” I told him I won’t. I am not sure he fully believes me though. My oldest son is very sweet and he has been worried about me since I started wearing the walking boot a month ago. He was also with me when I got the cortisone shot, my moral support. He constantly tells me I work out too much. lol… hardly. No, really. Although Tom did agree with him that I over do it… sigh. I don’t think so. People do waaaay more than me.

Now, I’m not planning on running at all at the moment. I just got these shoes in preparation to run. And I’m not jumping the gun here. My doc told me the other day to start weaning my self off the boot. Hooray!! A few hours on, a few hours off. The first day (last Friday) it felt rather odd to have a regular shoe on my left foot.

The good news is, my foot is feeling pretty good. I haven’t had any plantar pain at all. Still, I don’t see myself running just yet. Admittedly, I’m scared! I would like to try walking in these groovy shoes I found and see how that makes my foot feel. If I can’t walk, I certainly can’t run.

So, the shoes. They are Hoka One One and relatively new. I have done tons of research on them and was searching for a shoe to provide comfort and support without compromising running style (forefoot strike/natural running). These seem like they will do that and every review I read the person said they loved them. I even found out my ultra running friend Andrew has started wearing them and he loves them too! So they have to be good… yes? What especially got me interested and excited about them is that most people who have had chronic injury, plantars, knee issues, etc, have said that they thought they would never be able to run again until they tried this shoe. Let’s face it, it’s not the most attractive shoe out there. But they are supposed to reduce the beating on the body running does to us runners. Reviewers have said they make running fun, and they have very little soreness, if any, after running long in these.

something ed munster would wear?

something ed munster would wear?

They look like they pack some serious shoe weight with those 2 inch high heels. But in reality they don’t. These babies are about 11.3 oz. I went up a half size in them. Secretly, I like the idea of being up higher. Did you know I miss wearing my regular high heels? I’m sure I’ve whined about it recently.

I got the Bondi B shoes because they are for primarily road runners. You can still run trails on them, but I am a road runner (beep beep) so… these are for me. I did try on the Stinson Evo and liked them too, but they were a little less snug and I liked the fit of these better.

All I’ve done in them so far is wear them around the house, we are going on a couple hours here. So I can’t say yeah or neigh about them truly. I will in time, you can bet on that. I don’t even think I will walk in them much except from car to office etc, in the coming days. I kinda want to see Dr. Chiropractor C. W. and get that official OK. I am seeing him on Wednesday. I can wait till then. Heck, I’ve not run now for 10 full weeks! 10 Weeks! sigh. I’m sure I can go a few more days to get the go ahead to walk. And if that goes well, and I don’t feel any, not any, plantar fasciitis pain… then I will start, very slowly learning to run again. In my Ed Munster shoes. Which, I plan on wearing to work all week, even though I have a desk job. I’ll still be rotating the walking boot with this shoe every two or so hours until I talk to C. W. this week.

Look… even my cat loves them already!

nubby soles and long laces for kitty to attack!

nubby soles and long laces for kitty to attack! it’s been a while for her too.

This Is What It’s All About…

For me, running is about feeling good. In a number of ways, running has turned my life around and is what makes me feel good. What I especially like about running is the connections I’ve made: The people I’ve known that run, the one’s I’ve met, been reunited with (including my wonderful BF), become close friends with, been inspired by… all this because of running.

Last week I finally got back to running with the meet up group (Marin Social Runners-MSR, let’s emphasize the “social” part) that I hadn’t run with in almost 9 months. It was great. There is something really nice about meeting people (some I didn’t really know) and going for a run on a very cold, but beautiful morning. Sorta nutty when you think about it… getting up early on a Saturday morning, when you want to sleep in. But then you get there and everyone is… happy. How nice is that?

off we go...

off we go… even with the dog

The fast runner in the group was also the photographer. Even though he is speedy, he still hung with the group. I think that is pretty cool. That is what this group running thing is all about… running together. We can all do speedier runs on our own, but the group thing is just that… a group.

crown road is a great trail... nice and flat!

crown road is a great trail… nice and flat!

It’s fun to get some pics of yourself in motion. I actually look like a real runner. 😉

The next day, I got up early again, and ran with another gal, Hope, who I met through the Athleta run club I used to lead. I introduced her to Phoenix Lake. Hope is a fast runner, which is always a good challenge for me.

Today, one week later I met my buddy Beth, my Spartan teammate, my good friend, my sister in many ways for a nice and easy run around Phoenix Lake (yes, I love this place.) She had just done an intense mountain bike ride to the top of Mt. Tam the day before (7 miles up and up and up), and was a little sore. I was grateful about that, because, frankly… I’m not that interested in always running fast. I’m interested in connecting. I’m interested in good conversation (which we shared quite a bit in the 5 miles we ran.) I’m interested in the joy of running and sharing that with someone. I don’t want to feel like it’s a workout I have to do. I don’t want to feel like I have to run X amount of miles (although I confess I made her run past the cars until we hit an even five!) I don’t want to feel like I have to run a certain pace. I’ll do it if I feel like it. I don’t want to feel any pressure when I run. I want to have fun!!!

we represent athleta well... post run, post coffee gab fest

we represent athleta well… post run, post coffee gab fest

I enjoyed my time with Beth, and am a little sad that she is leaving Northern California for the spring to continue her studies in Southern California. Although I have every intention of visiting and hopefully doing a race one weekend this spring with her down there.

In the meantime, I am so grateful for our friendship, which came about through… yes, running. Even though we grew up in neighboring towns, went to the same high school and knew the same people, we never were friends. We really connected through running, via Facebook, because she was inspired by me and my running. Long story short, she got me to jet down to San Diego last year, stay with her and do the Spartan Race. We hardly knew each other except for emails back and forth. But connected in so many ways, now we are like sisters, so similar in our thoughts, ideas and courage to make our lives better. So similar in the place we are in our lives, connecting in ways that only woman our age can, sharing our joys and sorrows and helping figure stuff out. It’s almost like therapy!

Which brings me back to today’s run. It was just pure bliss to be out in nature to connect with someone who shares your ideas about running and just wants to have fun… running along, in this beautiful place we live.

One of my New’s Resolution is to go to more meet ups, run more with friends. Connect… talk about life and maybe talk a little about running.

This is what it’s all about. To just enjoy the journey.

Today is the 5th day of the new year, and so far, I think I’m keeping that resolve.